Considering Federalism

Xdvbw2xnjowp t
This book does not have a description
Curriculet Details
16 Questions
19 Annotations
1 Quiz

In this activity students will read about the basics of the U.S. Federal system of government, as well as explore how it has evolved over time. In an effort to prepare them for a potential Socratic Seminar they are frequently also asked to form an opinion and explain it with evidence. Next, they will consider how the federal system works in times of crisis (after natural disasters), and form an opinion about which form of federalism is sustainable and best for citizens in such circumstances. To be successful I suggest that they have had an introduction to the topic in class, and understand the historical context for it's creation. Additionally, it is recommended that they be allowed to discuss the information periodically in small groups. There are reflection questions at the end of the activity, but there is also an option to do a Fishbowl Socratic Seminar. Please note that the question numbers in the curriculet are there for whomever is moderating the discussion so that they might keep the conversation on track. If you are interested in having students do the seminar it would be beneficial for them to find another example of FEMA in action as homework. The rubric and reflection for the seminar are the final annotation in the curriculet.

The curriculet is being added to your library

Considering Federalism

Please be aware that the AP, as well as many study guides and textbooks, use the following terms interchangeably: Federal/National/Central Government; Shared/Concurrent Powers; Express/Enumerated/Federal Powers; Reserved/State Powers; Dual Federalism/Layer cake; Cooperative Federalism /Marble cake; New Federalism/Devolution  
This Venn Diagram depicts Federalism as it was originally conceived. This system worked well until the Great Depression set in during the 1930s. (*The AP expects you to have this information memorized, and understand the vocabulary in it.)  (This annotation contains an image)
In this short clip from Facts of Congress, you will see a simple explanation of Federalism.  (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6
Recently, with issues such as same sex marriage, legalization of marijuana, voter restriction laws and gun rights, this clause has been tested. Do you think it would be more effective if there was one federal law concerning issues such as these, or should it be left up to individual states? Please write a paragraph that includes a clear thesis and provides supporting evidence to substantiate your claim.   
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2
Sample AP QuestionThe reserved powers of the state governments can best be described as those powers 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2
Sample AP QuestionIn a federal system of government, political power is primarily 
In this video you will hear about key information related to Federalism. It is a bit of a review of what you just read, but it will also preview key vocabulary you will need for the rest of the activity.  (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2
Sample AP QuestionTo which characteristic of American Government does the term “federalism” refer? 
In this short clip from the Two AP Teachers you will get a detailed overview of Federalism. They will provide you with a visual explanation of our system and review the historical context for its creation. (This annotation contains a video)
As part of their series on the first one hundred years of the Supreme Court, PBS compiled information about landmark cases during that time period. Here you will find excellent information related to the Gibbons v. Ogden case, as well as many others that the AP may ask about. (This annotation contains a link)
In this clip from Historical Spotlight, you will see an in-depth description of the the key Supreme Court case McCulloch v. Maryland. This is a case the AP expects you to be familiar with so it is worth taking notes as you watch. (This annotation contains a video)
This infographic illustrates the cake analogy that many texts use to explain how Federalism has changed over time.  (This annotation contains an image)
In this clip from "The Century, America's Time: Stormy Weather," you will gain good contextual information about how the government responded to the Depression. (This annotation contains a video)
This documentary explains some of the effects that LBJ's Great Society programs had on the nation. (This annotation contains a video)
In this article from PBS you will read an in depth description of Nixon's approach to government. If you are confused about how and why reforms transpired, this is an excellent resource.  (This annotation contains a link)
The AP often will ask questions related to government funding. This site breaks down the four types of grants offered by the federal government. The two most common tend to be block and categorical grants.  (This annotation contains a link)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6
After reviewing the types of Federalism we have used in this country, which do you feel is the ideal approach for the nation? Please explain why that form offers the most benefits to citizens.   
In this short clip from the Two AP Teachers you will review the Supremacy Clause (Article VI, Clause II of the Constitution). (This annotation contains a video)
In this video special from ABC news you will learn about how federalism failed the victims of Hurricane Katrina.  (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3
What happens to the government when times of crisis interrupt our daily priorities and responsibilities?   
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6
Please explain what the federal government should be responsible for. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6
What should the public or private sector (citizens or businesses not affiliated directly with government) be responsible for? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6
Should our government intervene in all situations for which there seems to be a need?   
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2
Were the actions of the bureaucrats/bureaucratic agencies (FEMA, Department of Homeland Security, National Guard, Military, etc.) and the government in the example(s) effective and efficient? Please explain. 
A U.S. flag still hung on the remains of homes in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., in December, nearly two months after Superstorm Sandy tore through the area. (NPR, Spencer Platt/Getty Images) (This annotation contains an image)
More on Superstorm Sandy from the Wall Street Journal. If you need a reminder about what happened, this 7-minute clip is worth viewing -- it does a good job explaining exactly what public officials were dealing with. (This annotation contains a video)
The Speaker of the House is often considered to be the most powerful member of Congress. The Speaker is a member of the majority party in the House, and he/she controls all voting and committee assignments and determines which bills get debated when. The AP will expect you to be familiar with the responsibilities of the job, and who is currently serving as Speaker. Right now the job falls to Republican John Boehner (pronounced Bay-ner) of Ohio. (This annotation contains a link)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2
Do you agree with Chris Edwards' statement? Explain why you feel he is correct or incorrect. 
In this photo essay from The Atlantic, you can see the damage caused by this massive EF5 tornado.  (This annotation contains a link)
A look at the devastation caused by Hurricane Irene.  (This annotation contains a link)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6
Considering the recent surges in disaster relief, do you feel Daniel Weiss' proposed solution will work? If yes, explain what makes the plan viable. If no, what other policy solution might you propose? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9
How can we avoid government waste in times of prosperity and peace, and in times of crisis? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8
Are there other crises occurring in this country that the government—state or federal—should be addressing? Explain. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2
Released AP FRQ from the 2007 Exam: The framers of the United States Constitution created a federal system. (a) Define federalism. (b) Select two of the following and explain how each has been used to increase the power of the federal government relative to the states.• Categorical grants • Federal mandates • Selective incorporation (c) Select two of the following and explain how each has been used to increase the power of the states relative   to the federal government.• Welfare Reform Act of 1996• Block grants • Tenth Amendment 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8
After weighing all of the information presented, what is the ideal version of Federalism? Explain your rationale in a short essay using evidence from your studies. 
Federalism AP Prep Questions