Jane Eyre

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Jane Eyre, the story of a young girl and her passage into adulthood, was an immediate commercial success at the time of its original publication in 1847. Its representation of the underside of domestic life and the hypocrisy behind religious enthusiasm drew both praise and bitter criticism, while Charlotte Brontë's striking expose of poor living conditions for children in charity schools as well as her poignant portrayal of the limitations faced by women who worked as governesses sparked great controversy and social debate. Jane Eyre, Brontë's best-known novel, remains an extraordinary coming-of-age narrative, and one of the great classics of literature. (From feedbooks.com)
Curriculet Details
362 Questions
46 Annotations
19 Quizzes

Written for juniors and seniors, this interactive digital curriculum contains annotations with links to allusions (poetry, fiction, Shakespeare, Greek mythology) and images of people, places and things relevant to the setting of the novel, along with videos about feminism, tone versus mood, and symbolism. Students will explore the themes of gender equality, morality, social class and, of course, love. This Common Core aligned unit will ground students in the book by asking them to use textual evidence to support their analysis of what the text says explicitly and inferentially. It also focuses on vocabulary development and literary device awareness. The Common Core aligned questions and answers and free online quizzes in our curriculet support reading comprehension and increase student engagement.

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Chapter 1

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What characteristic of the narrator does this early passage emphasize? 
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Mrs. Reed's use of the word "cavillers" conveys that Jane's question is which of the following? 
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This description, and the comparison of Jane to a "Turk," best reflects what theme important to nineteenth century British literature? 
The following passage is taken from a famous eighteenth century poem by Scottish poet James Thomson. You can read about the poem and Thomson here:  (This annotation contains a link)
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This passage suggests that Jane enjoys which of the following? 
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This description is intended to cause the reader to feel which of the following toward John Reed? 
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This passage reveals that Jane is which of the following? 
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This sentence suggests that Jane 

Chapter 2

Watch this video for more on feminism, an important theme in this novel.  (This annotation contains a video)
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Bessie's statement suggests that Jane 
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"Like a pale throne" is what kind of literary device? 
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In this sentence, "harmony" most nearly means which of the following? 
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What does this passage reveal about Jane? What kind of personality and thoughts does she have? 
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What wish is Jane talking about? 
Chapters 1-2 

Chapter 3

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This passage suggests that whoever is with Jane 
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What does the narrator do for the first time here? 
Gulliver's Travels was a very famous eighteenth century novel by English novelist Jonathan Swift. The book is about a surgeon who travels to several different magical lands. Some people consider it a forerunner of modern science fiction. Like many of the other books Jane reads during the early part of the novel, Gulliver's Travels is an adventure story that takes her out of her ordinary existence and allows her to escape into fantasy. (This annotation contains a link)
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What do you think is the significance of this song to Jane? Why does she cry? 
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This statement suggests that Jane believes she has ________ reason(s) to cry. 
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What does Jane mean by this statement? 
Guy Fawkes famously plotted to assassinate King James I by blowing up Parliament in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. This comparison paints Jane as a rebel and troublemaker. 

Chapter 4

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"Insuperable" here most nearly means which of the following? 
Tone and mood are two elements of literature you should be familiar with. This video will explain more. (This annotation contains a video)
This is attire similar to what Jane's cousins might have worn. (This annotation contains an image)
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"Traffic" here most nearly means 
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Why do you think Bronte has the narrator give an exact date and time before she tells this story? 
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Please say a few words about the significance of this question that Jane asks herself. 
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What did the man want Jane to say she must do to avoid hell? 
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"Sowing aversion" is what kind of literary device? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Please name some things that Mrs. Reed is not consistent about. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What might be bothering Mrs. Reed? 
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Jane's tone here is mostly 
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This phrase most nearly means that outside it is 
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Why does Jane have a new way of talking? 
Chapters 3-4 

Chapter 5

A pelisse is a type of women's coat.  (This annotation contains an image)
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How does Jane most likely feels about being away from Gateshead and the Reeds? 
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What does Bronte mean by "the mug being common to all?" 
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What does the reference to "the Babel clamour of tongues" suggest? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
This statement suggests that Miss Temple 
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Throughout this conversation, Jane seems 
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What kinds of things does Jane seem to focus on during her first day at Lowood? 

Chapter 6

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Why might Burns not explain this to Miss Scatcherd? 
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"The licensed uproar" is an example of which device? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane thinks that Helen is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Here, Jane admits that how she feels about the Reeds is not 
Chapters 5-6 

Chapter 7

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Hardly" here seems most nearly to mean 
A surtout is a men's long coat.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Mr. Brocklehurst is criticizing Miss Temple for feeding the girls 
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What is Mr. Brocklehurst trying to justify here? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
What does Mr. Brocklehurst mean by "I have a Master to serve whose kingdom is not of this world?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
Comparing a "kind whisper" to a dagger is an example of what? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"The new feeling bore me up" most nearly means that Jane was feeling 

Chapter 8

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Jane thinks that Helen's absence 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
What does Helen mean here? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Helen Burns is 
The organ of veneration is a term in phrenology, which was the study of human skulls. Although the science of phrenology has since been disproven, it was an influential field in the 18th and 19th centuries. In this illustration, the skull is divided into different areas representing each of the different organs phrenologists thought made up the human head. (This annotation contains an image)
Chapters 7-8 

Chapter 9

Symbolism is an important aspect of many art forms, including literature. The following video explains symbolism.  (This annotation contains a video)
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What literary device is Bronte using here? 
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What is a positive result of so many Lowood girls being sick? 
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The nurse thinks that Jane might _______ if she goes out in the evening. 
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The "unsnuffed candle" might symbolize 
"Resurgam" is Latin for "I shall rise again." 

Chapter 10

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Here, Jane is explaining that the pace of the story is about to change. How is it going to change? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane's life for the past eight years at Lowood has been very 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Soliloquised" refers to the literary device of soliloquy. What is a soliloquy? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
The ____________ are Jane's commentaries on the advertisement. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Jane mean by saying "my plans could no longer be confined to my own breast?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Bessie obviously does not think Jane is _____. 
Chapters 9-10 

Chapter 11

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Here, Bronte is calling our attention to the fact that 
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Who were the "fine people" Jane lived among? 
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This statement suggests that Jane 
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Please use the word "implore" in a sentence of your own. 
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What two places is Jane comparing in this passage? 
Sophie, Adela, and Mr. Rochester came across the sea on a steamship that looked something like this.  (This annotation contains a link)
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The library at Thornfield is 
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Jane thinks Mrs. Fairfax isn't good at ______ Mr. Rochester. 
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The noise that Jane thought might be a ghost was actually 

Chapter 12

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Here, "belied" most nearly means 
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In this passage, it is clear that Jane 
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"Mdlle. Jeannette" is Adele's name for 
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What literary device is being used for the moon? 
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Jane is comforted by the stranger's _______. 
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Why do you think Jane might feel "disposed to obey?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why is Jane unhappy to return to Thornfield? 
Chapters 11-12 

Chapter 13

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What do you think Jane means by "a rill from the outer world was flowing through it?" 
Here is a picture of Heidelberg Castle on the Rhine, as it looks now.  (This annotation contains an image)
This is a drawing of Mr. Rochester as one reader imagines him.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Jane probably means that 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester is surprised that Jane 
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Mr. Rochester thinks that he should make ______ judgments about Jane. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
For what is Mr. Rochester apologizing here? 
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Mr. Rochester is asking whether Jane 
The Latmos are a mountain range in Turkey that boasts strange and mysterious rock formations.  (This annotation contains an image)
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What does Mrs. Fairfax say that Mr. Rochester might find gloomy? 

Chapter 14

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"Rencontre" is a French word that most nearly means 
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Why did Mr. Rochester send for Mrs. Fairfax? 
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Mr. Rochester's tone in this question is  
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"Hard ad tough as an India-rubber ball" is an example of what literary device? 
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Mr. Rochester means that Jane is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane's reply is mostly 
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Mr. Rochester's comparison of Jane's mind to water is what kind of literary device? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.6
The tone of Mr. Rochester's speech to Jane is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
To whom is Mr. Rochester speaking? 
In Greek tradition, a Sphynx is a mythical creature who poses riddles to its listeners and punishes them if they cannot answer.  (This annotation contains an image)
Watch this video to see a depiction of part of Jane's conversation with Mr. Rochester.  (This annotation contains a video)
Character Development 

Chapter 15

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This sentence  
A porte cochere is a covered entrance.  (This annotation contains an image)
Charlotte Bronte is referring to Shakespeare's Macbeth, in which Macbeth and Banquo come across three witches who address Macbeth by three different titles, all of which are predicted to come true. The witches are considered to be ugly and wicked, and it is their scheme-filled predictions that lead Macbeth's downfall and death. Mr. Rochester compares Celine Varens, Adele's mother, to the three witches of Macbeth, and tells Jane how he chanced to become guardian of the child. (This annotation contains an image)
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Here, Mr. Rochester tells Jane that she differs from Celine Varens in her  
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Why does Jane like Adele more upon hearing of her history? 
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As Jane gets to know Mr. Rochester, he seems 
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When Jane heard mysterious laughter before, what was she told was the source of that laughter? 
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Mr. Rochester's reacts to Jane's rescue with 
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Mr. Rochester plans to 
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Why do you think Jane feels disturbed yet joyful? 

Chapter 16

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
What story has obviously been given about the fire? 
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What kind of plans might Jane suspect Grace Poole of laying? 
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Jane speculates that it might make sense for Mr. Rochester not to report Grace Poole's crime if Grace were 
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Here, Jane says that despite the difference between her position and Mr. Rochester's, she is able to 
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This repeated question lets us know that Jane is very ______ about Miss Ingram. 
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What literary device does Bronte use in this passage? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Who is speaking to Jane in this passage? 
Chapters 15-16 

Chapter 17

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Here, Jane is trying not to 
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What do you think Jane's doubts and worries are about? 
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Jane does not feel the need to 
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The quotation marks in this passage let us know that 
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Why does Jane not expect that she and Adele will be sent for by Mr. Rochester? 
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Mrs. Fairfax's advice to Jane about meeting the ladies is that she should 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why is Jane smiling if Adele's attention to dress is "ludicrous" and "painful"? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
The parenthetical phrase "I suppose she thought" suggests that the Dowager's wardrobe 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
Bronte backtracks here to describe how Adele has  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
This passage shows that Jane has been 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Assimilates" here most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
Who is speaking here, and to whom? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
How do you think Jane is likely to feel during this discussion of governesses? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
This statement means that Miss Ingram's commands are 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why do you think Jane is emotional? 

Chapter 18

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Why is Thornfield Hall more alive than before? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.9
The pair are acting out a story from 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester and Miss Ingram seem to be  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
The figurative language in this passage compares Miss Ingram to 
This passage draws on the Greek myth of Cupid, who shoots arrows into the hearts of lovers to make them fall in love.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Jane believes that, in Mr. Rochester's place, she would only marry 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
What does the phrase "supercilious taciturnity" suggest about Blanche's behavior? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Intelligence" here most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
To whom is Jane comparing a gander and a sheep? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Who are "the quality?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
After Miss Ingram enters the fortune-teller's room, the ladies are 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
The fact that the fortune teller can tell the ladies about their pasts suggests that she is 
Chapters 17-18 

Chapter 19

A sibyl is a female prophet. One of the most famous was the Sibyl at Delphi, a temple in Greco-Roman myth. Her most famous representation is on Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel ceiling.  (This annotation contains an image)
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What could the fortune teller be talking about? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane thinks that the topic of courtship and marriage is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
According to the fortune teller, Miss Ingram wants to marry Mr. Rochester for 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
The fortune teller observes that Jane is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
This phrase most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane suspected that the fortune teller was who, in disguise? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
To whom is Mr. Rochester toasting? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Behest" most nearly means 

Chapter 20

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Setting this exclamation in its own paragraph ________ the reader. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.9
Mr. Rochester is trying to ________ the shrieking episode by using the phrase "much ado about nothing." 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
This sentence contains an example of what literary device? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester is giving Jane a lot of responsibility. What are some different ways Jane might be feeling? 
Furies are mythological winged goddesses of vengeance.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
The fact that "she" bit Mr. Mason probably makes Jane more sure that 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
This statement makes us think of what mythological creature? 
A post-chaise was a fast carriage of the time. (This annotation contains an image)
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What literary device is used to describe the house as a dungeon in this passage? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Where Mr. Rochester is concerned, Jane can be 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
The story Mr. Rochester has told about the sinful, "dissipated" traveler seems to be about 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Mr. Rochester urge Jane to go back inside? 
Chapters 19-20 

Chapter 21

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
This passage is an example of a 
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Jane's dream about the "baby-phantom" is an example of what literary device? 
Miss Ingram's morning robe would have likely been in this style.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester seems concerned that Jane 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester does not want Jane to 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why do you think Mr. Rochester's goodbye is so awkward and drawn out? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane is comparing 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane is observing that young ladies can be 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Toward Mrs. Reed, Jane 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.6
Jane and Mrs. Reed are referring to Jane 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Who is Jane drawing? 
The Book of Common Prayer is a book of Anglican prayer. The Rubric is the portion of the book devoted to what practitioners of the religion should wear. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Eliza is advising Georgianna to live 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
Jane is thinking about 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why is the letter from John Eyre important? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane is _______________ however Mrs. Reed feels about her. 

Chapter 22

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What do you think Mr. Rochester's reaction might be upon Jane's return? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Eliza is going to become a 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
In this passage, "cynosure" most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane remind herself that Thornfield is not her home? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester seems ________ that Jane was away. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane's statement here could be rephrased as which of the following proverbs? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
When Adele says she is ready to see her little English mother, she is talking about 
Chapters 21-22 

Chapter 23

Like most novelists, Charlotte Bronte uses similes and metaphors to express ideas. This video will describe the differences between these two literary devices.  (This annotation contains a video)
This line appears in in an 18th century poem, "The Turkish Lady," written by English poet Thomas Campbell. The poem is linked below. Notice how often references to Turkey and Turkish culture come up in Jane Eyre.  (This annotation contains a link)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why might Jane not want to walk with Mr. Rochester in this circumstance? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane's voice is probably 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
Mr. Rochester is using an extended metaphor to describe the _______ between himself and Jane. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane say she is better than Mr. Rochester? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why might Jane doubt Mr. Rochester's proposal? 
Watch this video for a depiction of Mr. Rochester's proposal to Jane.  (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester expects that people will _______ his marriage to Jane. 

Chapter 24

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The stormy night's giving way to a calm and beautiful day could be a metaphor for Jane's troubles subsiding. This would be an example of what literary device? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Mr. Rochester has sent for 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane's expectations of a husband's behavior are 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane not want Mr. Rochester's jewels? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester points out that, last night in the garden, Jane  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Jane want Mr. Rochester to do? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
What does the saying "all is not gold that glitters" mean? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Who is Jane's "gloomy monitress?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
Mr. Rochester's tone during this moon story is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
Here, Adele calls Mr. Rochester "a true liar." This is an example of what literary device? 
Danae was a princess of Argos in the Greek Peloponnese. When her father learned a prophecy that he was destined to be killed by a son of his daughter, he locked Danae away in a subterranean, bronze chamber. Her prison, however, was easily infiltrated by the god Zeus who impregnated her in the guise of a golden shower. She conceived and bore him a son named Perseus. As soon as her father learned of this, he placed Danae and the infant in a chest and set them afloat at sea (see image below). By the providence of the gods they drifted safely to the island of Seriphos, where the fisherman Diktys brought them ashore and welcomed them into his house.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane desires 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane want to avoid conversation with Mr. Rochester right now? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane want to avoid romantic situations with Mr. Rochester? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester is feeling mostly 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Mrs. Fairfax approves of Jane's 
Chapters 23-24 

Chapter 25

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Wasted" here most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Whose garments are in Jane's closet? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.6
In addressing the reader here, Bronte creates 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
The chestnut tree broke apart 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
In this passage, the word "hypochondriac" most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.9
The metaphor of Jane as a lamb refers to which literary text? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
When did Jane promise to stay up with Mr. Rochester on the night before his wedding? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
In this sentence, "caress" most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Here, Jane is describing 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Mr. Rochester mean by "I would rather be incensed than saddened"? 
A portmanteau is a container for holding clothes. It is a traveling box in which clothes hang vertically.  (This annotation contains a link)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Mr. Rochester is telling Jane that the figure she saw was 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester ________ telling Jane the truth about the woman who tore her veil. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
In what way is Adele an emblem of Jane's past life? 

Chapter 26

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
Why is Jane wearing the plain square and not a bridal veil? 
A surplice is a priest's garment.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane says that she isn't noticing 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why can Mr. Rochester not marry Jane? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Where have we seen Mr. Mason before? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
Who is Mr. Mason? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Who is "the maniac"? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester is complaining about being deprived of 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why is Jane's removal of the wedding gown significant? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane compares her love for Mr. Rochester to 
Watch this video and consider the recurring motif of fire and ice. (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
In this difficult time, Jane seeks comfort in 
Chapters 25-26 
Watch this video for a depiction of the interrupted wedding.  (This annotation contains a video)

Chapter 27

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane cares less about not being able to marry Mr. Rochester than about 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane realizes that no one 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane forgives Mr. Rochester but 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane did not ask for wine, but for 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Mr. Rochester wishes that Jane _________ he is married. 
Achan is a biblical figure in the Book of Joshua. He is punished and Achan's tent is the location of his punishment. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.9
"In pain and sickness" is an echo of 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"You are to share my solitude" is an example of what literary device? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Mr. Rochester prefers that Jane 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
What is Mr. Rochester asking Jane to do here? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester mistook  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What was concealed from Mr. Rochester? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester accepts Jane's 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Why does Mr. Rochester contemplate suicide? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What is the "fault" that keeps Grace from being the best possible caretaker of Bertha? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester went to Europe seeking  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
What is the creature Mr. Rochester saw in Hay Lane? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester thought Jane seemed both 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
Mr. Rochester compares Jane to a flower and a gem in a(n) 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
Here, Jane breaks Mr. Rochester's story, which was a  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why will Jane not be Mr. Rochester's? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
What literary device does Bronte use in this passage? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
Why does Jane think it is important to leave Mr. Rochester even though she does not want to? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
The red-room for Jane recalls a time of 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Visionary" here most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane is trying to remain 
This line references the last line from John Milton's Paradise Lost: "Through Eden took their solitary way." In that line, Milton describes Adam and Eve's expulsion from the Garden of Eden. 

Chapter 28

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why is Jane in Whitcross? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Why is Jane an outcast? 
The landscape in which Jane is wandering is a marshy wetland with extensive vegetation, resembling this:  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane is not sure what to do about her 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
What does the shopkeeper say about employment in the area? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Where is Jane, and why does Jane feel comfortable stopping here? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Why is a "well-dressed beggar" an object of suspicion? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane eats porridge that 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane want to live? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
The small candlelight represent Jane's 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane knows which languages? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Why does it bother the woman to go into the "yonder" room? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
Hannah speaks using a different _______ than her daughters. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does the speaker fear Jane might be? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
Pointing out that "this is the climax," Bronte creates in the reader 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John is ______ that Hannah did not immediately let Jane in. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane has changed her 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane says that she trusts the women 
Chapters 27-28 

Chapter 29

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Jane mean by being "grown" to the bed? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John reads Jane's face and determines that she is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane has lost 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane is confident in her ability to 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane faults Hannah for 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane is saying that she enjoys being _______ at times. 
Jane is describing St. John's face as a Classical Greek or Roman one. The features might be similar to these on an ancient Roman sculpture.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
By denying any connections, Jane may 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
St. John's questions about marriage make Jane 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane tells _________ about her alias. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane say she will be all of these occupations? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
By "withdrew," Jane most nearly means 

Chapter 30

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Who is "they" in this passage? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
What does the word "pastoral" most nearly mean in this sentence? 
Calvinist doctrines of election and predestination hold that very person is either destined to be saved by Jesus Christ or was not. Under Calvinism, there is no working your way to salvation; there is only discovering one's predetermined path. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
What does St. John Rivers mean by saying that helping Jane is like a blind man helping the lame? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
St. John is asking Jane to be 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John is full of 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
The family's reaction to news of someone's death is  
Chapters 29-30 

Chapter 31

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
Where do you think Jane is? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
In this sentence, "cipher" most nearly means which of the following? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane thinks it is _________ to be where she is than with Mr. Rochester. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
In this conversation, St. John is guessing at 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John is describing 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Is St. John looking at the girl? Why or why not? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Jane think St. John is curbing? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why is St. John suffering? 

Chapter 32

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
When Jane treats the pupils well, it makes them  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does St. John not profess his love to Miss Oliver? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Electrified" in this context most nearly means which of the following? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
This statement most likely sounds ________ to Jane. 
The 5th of November is Guy Fawkes day. Remember that Jane was compared to Guy Fawkes, who plotted to blow up Parliament, early in the novel. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
The longer St. John holds the picture, the more he 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Jane mean by "you would have sufficient thought for both yourself and her?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John ________ Rosamond as a missionary's wife. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
St. John claims that his feelings for Miss Oliver are 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
The "she" in this passage is 
Chapters 31-32 

Chapter 33

"Marmion" is an epic poem by Sir Walter Scott about the 1513 Battle of Flodden Field. It was published in 1808. It also addresses themes of lust.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane is _________ St. John. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Mr. Oliver pay for? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Who is St. John saying must be found? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John's tone is mostly 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Upon hearing she has inherited a fortune, Jane feels 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
How does Jane react to St. John's claim that he is told about her uncle's death because he is clergy? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
St. John and Jane Eyre are most likely ________ each other. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
Why is Jane so happy about the discovery that she has cousins? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What is Jane considering? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Tranquilize" here most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why would Jane be tormented by the twenty thousand pounds? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane protests that she will never marry; St. John thinks 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Both coincided in my opinion" means that both 

Chapter 34

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Rustic" here most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
What is Jane proposing to do? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Jane mean by "as if you were speaking Greek?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
St. John is _________ what Jane has done to Moor House. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why is St. John not enthusiastic about his sisters' return? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane thinks that St. John seems ________ to those closest to him. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
On this page, Jane describes the family's 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does St. John choose Jane to learn Hinostanee over his sisters? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
How does this compare with how Jane felt about serving Mr. Rochester and his household? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane feels that St. John's expectations are 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Why does the "bitter check" from Mr. Briggs upset Jane? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
By "medium" Jane most nearly means 
The Ganges is a major river flowing through northeast India.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane is feeling 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
St. John is __________ Jane. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John reveals that he has been testing Jane 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane feels that it would be absurd and weak  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
"Still as a prostrate column" is an example of what literary device? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John's words cause Jane to feel mostly 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What will never do? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
What does Jane mean by "he could command his countenance thoroughly?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane goes to St. John to 
Chapters 33-34 

Chapter 35

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John forgives Jane for refusing his proposal but 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
"Unmoved" here most nearly means 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
What does Jane mean by "If I were to marry you, you would kill me"? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane says that does not believe she would be ________ by not going to India. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Diana's tone here is  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
St. John's idea of marriage is that 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
Jane's tone here is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does St. John fear for Jane? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane is almost moved to marry St. John out of 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane considers _______________ but is interrupted by Mr. Rochester's voice. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
"Where there is energy to command well enough, obedience never fails" can be restated as 

Chapter 36

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
Whom do you think Jane is going to see? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane is _________ about her plan to see Mr. Rochester. 
The English Channel is the body of water separating England from France. (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.6
Jane imagines herself from the perspective of 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Thornfield Hall has 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What does Jane mean about "the hour of fatality" at Thornfield? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane interrupts here to 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
How do you think it could make Jane feel to hear this? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane's reaction to hearing Mr. Rochester is blind is that 
Watch this video to find out what Bertha symbolizes.  (This annotation contains a video)
Chapters 35-36 

Chapter 37

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
During Jane's journeys, the weather is often 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
Jane's question means she is wondering 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane wants to _______ Mr. Rochester. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Because he cannot see, he asks  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester's speech here suggests that he has been visited by 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane not care about being married? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
Jane is comparing how she feels when she is with Mr. Rochester to how she felt 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Jane's response to Mr. Rochester's question "Am I hideous?" has what tone? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Mr. Rochester's confession of love make Jane sad? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Mr. Rochester seems _______ St. John. 
Vulcan is the Latin god of fire and metalworking. He is often depicted as deformed, either from a fall from Olympus, or from his birth.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Mr. Rochester is feeling 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Why does Jane think that St. John is "as cold as an iceberg?" 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
In this speech, the "budding woodbine" is 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
Jane says she loves Mr. Rochester better now because 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Mr. Rochester says he has found ______. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
What is the coincidence Jane finds in Mr. Rochester's story? Why does she keep it from him? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
The word "homeward" here lets us know that 
Watch this video for more on the theme of equality between men and women in Jane Eyre.  (This annotation contains a video)

Chapter 38 - CONCLUSION

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.6
Addressing the reader in this manner is an example of using 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
Bronte is playing with what element of style in the speech of Mary? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
For Jane, marriage is about 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2
Happy endings for female characters in this novel seem to include 
Watch this video to learn more about the modern relevance of Jane Eyre.  (This annotation contains a video)
Chapters 37-38