Through the Looking Glass (And What Alice Found There)

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Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871) is a work of children's literature by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). It is the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865). Although it makes no reference to the events in the earlier book, the themes and settings of Through the Looking-Glass make it a kind of mirror image of Wonderland: the first book begins outdoors, in the warm month of May, on Alice's birthday (May 4), uses frequent changes in size as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of playing cards; the second opens indoors on a snowy, wintry night exactly six months later, on November 4 (the day before Guy Fawkes Night), uses frequent changes in time and spatial directions as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of chess. In it, there are many mirror themes, including opposites, time running backwards, and so on. (From feedbooks.com)
Curriculet Details
35 Questions
41 Annotations
3 Quizzes

Designed for students in the 4th grade, this free digital curriculum contains annotations explaining theme, poetic devices, and necessary background knowledge. It also contains videos that support comprehension such as videos about point-of-view and necessary textual background knowledge. Over the course of the book, students will answer Common Core questions and quizzes related to point of view, theme, and vocabulary. This free online unit will increase student engagement while building reading comprehension.

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Chapter 1 - Looking-Glass House

Did you know that you can look up any word in the text of the book or the text of the questions and answers? Just click (or press on mobile devices) the word you want to define and hold until the blue text selector pops up. When you release, a define option will appear. Since it's so easy to look up words, make sure you use this feature frequently. * There are lots of "nonsense" words in "Through the Looking Glass." These are words that are created by the author. There will be no definition for these.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Read this sentence from the text."....she added, looking reproachfully at the old cat, and speaking in as cross a voice as she could manage.."Which of the following sentences uses cross in the same way it is used in the text? 
Throughout this book the game of chess will be mentioned frequently. It is important that you understand some of the basics of chess as you read more of the book. Watch a few minutes of this video that explains chess so that you have some understanding of the game.  (This annotation contains a video)
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What is the "looking-glass"  Alice is describing? 
Have you noticed that some of the characters Alice is describing could be the pieces of a chess game?  (This annotation contains an image)
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Based on what you have read, what is happening in the looking-glass room? 
Jabberwocky is a poem that is full of nonsense words. Even though most of the words are made-up, this poem has beautiful rhythm and imagery. You should read this poem at least twice to get a feel for it.  (This annotation contains an image)
The poem ends here, so you might want to go back and reread it. Start with the word "Jabberwocky."  (This annotation contains an image)
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What does Alice mean when she says, "if I don't make haste..."? 

Chapter 2 - The Garden of Live Flowers

A tiger-lily is a type of flower.  (This annotation contains an image)
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What made the pink daisies change color? 
Who is the person the flowers are describing? What might be the "thorns" she wears round her head?  (This annotation contains an image)
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Using evidence from the story, how can the character of Alice be described? 
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Why does Alice think that she might have offended the Red Queen? 
Remember that there will be many references to the game of chess as the story unfolds.  (This annotation contains an image)
Do you recognize these familiar Nursery Rhyme characters? In literature, authors might refer to other literary works in their writing. Tweedledee and Tweedledum as well as Humpty Dumpty would have been very familiar to the author of Through the Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Why is the Red Queen upset with Alice? 

Chapter 3 - Looking-Glass Insects

A pound is the currency used in some nations such as Great Britain. Today, one pound is equal to $1.59. So, this 10 pound note in the photo would be worth about $16.00. How much would the thousand pounds in the story be worth?  (This annotation contains an image)
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What does Alice mean when she notices that each animal must "speak in turn" ? 
Do you find this to be funny? Do we usually ENJOY insects, or do we think of them as pests?  (This annotation contains an image)
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Why does the gnat ask Alice if the insects "answer to their names"? 
This might be a good time for you to use the define feature!  (This annotation contains an image)
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Based on what you have read in the text, why is Alice determined to make it to the eighth square? 

Chapter 4 - Tweedledum and Tweedledee

Tweedledum is telling Alice to stop staring as he and Tweedledee are not wax figures in a wax museum. Wax figures look very real but are made of wax!  (This annotation contains an image)
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Each time that Tweedledee says, "contrariwise" what does he mean? 
"The Walrus and The Carpenter" tells of a friendly walrus and quiet carpenter who kindly invite some young oysters to join them for a walk on the beach. Gradually it becomes clear that the oysters have been invited for dinner--and that they are the main course! In another sense, who might these characters represent in our world? For instance, the Walrus says to the doomed Oysters: "I weep for you, I deeply sympathize" while secretly planning to eat "Those of the largest size." Who are the Walruses in our own world, shedding crocodile tears while taking advantage of other people? (This annotation contains an image)
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According to the poem, what do the Walrus and Carpenter want done with the beach? 
Are you anticipating what might happen based upon what you already know about the poem? When the Walrus says, "The time has come," what does he mean?  (This annotation contains an image)
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Why are the oysters the most upset at the prospect of being eaten? 
Watch this video about point of view. It uses the familiar tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears to help you understand how point of view differs for characters in the same story. As you watch, think about Alice's point of view as compared to the points of view of Tweedledee and Tweedledum.  (This annotation contains a video)
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Based on what you have read in the text, why is Alice upset and crying?   Use evidence from the story to support your response. 
Consider how the points of view of Alice and Tweedledee differ in this scene. How does Alice view the rattle compared to how he views it? What about the "uniforms" Tweedledee and Tweedledum are putting together, does Alice see them differently?  (This annotation contains an image)
Quiz 1 

Chapter 5 - Wool and Water

A lady's maid assists the Queen in getting dressed, styling her hair, and preparing for her day.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Read this sentence from the text."...the Queen said, as she bound the plaster round her finger with a bit of ribbon."Which of the following sentences uses bound in the same way as it is used in the sentence from the text? 
Did you notice that the Queen told Alice to not be exact with her age, but then gives her own age down to the day?  (This annotation contains an image)
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Why does the sheep tell Alice she cannot look "all around"? 
In rowing, feathering is a very skilled move in which the oar position is changed in the water. This photo shows oars in the feather position.  (This annotation contains an image)
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The theme of a story is the lesson that the author wants the reader to learn. Read this highlighted sentence from the text. This could be a theme. What does Alice mean that the "prettiest are always further"? 

Chapter 6 - Humpty Dumpty

The title of this chapter gives a big clue about the mysterious egg.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Read this sentence from the text. "I'm as certain of it, as if his name were written all over his face."What does "written all over his face" mean? 
Poetry has a rhythm or "beat." As you read "Humpty Dumpty," do you agree with Alice that the last line does not seem to have the same flow as the other lines of the poem?  (This annotation contains an image)
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How could you best describe Humpty Dumpty? 
A cravat is worn around the neck, but Alice can't tell if she is looking at Humpty's waist or neck because he is an egg!  (This annotation contains an image)
Remember that Jabberwocky is made of nonsense words that have no meaning.  (This annotation contains an image)
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What can you tell from Humpty Dumpty's explanation of the words from Jabberwocky? 
The poem that Humpty Dumpty recites to Alice is much easier to understand than the other poems you have read in the book. This poem rhymes at the end of each line, and the rhyme scheme is described as AA, BB, CC. The photo shows a similar rhyme scheme in a poem you should be familiar with.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Why does Alice keep interrupting Humpty Dumpty? 

Chapter 7 - The Lion and the Unicorn

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Why does Alice feel that the men are "uncertain" on their feet? 
Part of being a good reader is learning to make predictions. What might have happened to make the King send all of his men?  (This annotation contains an image)
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What does the King think when the Messenger says he saw "Nobody" on the road? 
Fighting for the crown can mean two things. It can mean that the Lion and the Unicorn WANT the crown, but it can also mean that the Lion and the Unicorn are fighting to PROTECT the crown.  (This annotation contains an image)
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What does the Unicorn mean when he asks Alice, "Is that a bargain"? 
At the time of Through the Looking Glass, brown bread was considered second rate. It was made of brown flour and was a food for the very poor. The photo shows what brown bread might have looked like at the time.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Based on what you have read in the book, who is the Monster that is cutting the cake? 
Have you noticed the idioms such as "all around town" and "drum them out of town" are used literally in this chapter?  (This annotation contains an image)

Chapter 8 - "It's my own Invention"

When the Knights mention the "Rules of Battle" and the White Knight remarks it is the "end" of his move, remember that Alice is acting out the plays in a chess game.  (This annotation contains an image)
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What is true of all of the characters that Alice has met on her adventure? 
Part of being a good reader is being able to get a mental picture of what you are reading. Can you picture this humorous scene with Alice and the Knight who can't stay on his horse?  (This annotation contains an image)
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What does Alice mean when she describes the Knight's look as "grave"? 
The pudding course is the dessert course. In some countries, the term pudding is used to describe any sweet dish.  (This annotation contains an image)
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How can you describe most of the Knight's inventions? 
Do you notice all of the detail in this scene? These details help you in creating a mental image.  (This annotation contains an image)
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What does the aged man mean by "that's the way I get my bread"? 
If you aren't sure what a haddock is, make sure you define it so that you get a full picture of what the aged man says.  (This annotation contains an image)
Alice has made it to the Eighth Square! What do you think will happen next? Will being Queen be what she imagined?  (This annotation contains an image)
Quiz 2 

Chapter 9 - Queen Alice

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What does the White Queen mean when she says that Alice is in that "state of mind"? 
Have you noticed that the Red Queen and White Queen are giving Alice problems that cannot be solved?  (This annotation contains an image)
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Based on what you read in the text, what does White Queen mean when she tells Alice that she will "come to it in time"? 
Do you think that Alice is ever going to get ahead of the Red and White Queens, or do they have a response for everything she says?  
Long ago, women curled their hair by using papers instead of rollers. The Red Queen is suggesting that the White Queen would look better if her hair was curled.  (This annotation contains a link)
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What does "ready to find fault with anybody" mean? 
The joint that the Red Queen is referring to is a large piece of meat that is cooked as one piece. In this case, it is a leg of lamb.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Why does Alice say that the pudding returning is like a "conjuring-trick"? 
It is a custom in some countries to drink a toast to the ruler, especially if the ruler is a king or queen. Sometimes the toaster says, "Long live the Queen!"  (This annotation contains an image)
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Based on what you have read, why is Alice upset with the Red Queen? 

Chapter 11 - Waking

Read the title of this chapter. Does this give you an idea about why Alice had her grand adventure?  (This annotation contains an image)

Chapter 12 - Which Dreamed it?

Quiz 3