Peaches

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Three Georgia peaches are in for one juicy summer . . .

. . . but Birdie would rather eat Thin Mints and sulk in the A/C.

Leeda would prefer to sneak off with her boyfriend, Rex.

And Murphy would much rather cause a little mischief.

Together these three very different girls will discover the secret to finding the right boy, making the truest of friends, and picking the perfect Georgia peach.

Curriculet Details
75 Questions
76 Annotations
3 Quizzes

Designed for students in 9-10 grade, this free digital curriculum contains annotations explaining cultural references such as boiled peanuts, textual connections such as references to Greek myth and explanations of motifs and themes. It also contains interactive videos that support comprehension, such as videos about figurative language and Steel Magnolias, a movie about Southern women and their friendships. Over the course of the book, students will answer Common Core questions and quizzes related to the subjects of character motivation, thematic development, and identification of literary devices. This free online unit will increase student engagement while building reading comprehension.

The curriculet is being added to your library

Before

Did you know that you can look up any word in the text of the book or the text of the questions and answers? Just click (or press on mobile devices) the word you want to define and hold until the blue text selector pops up. When you release, a define option will appear. Since it's so easy to look up words, make sure you use this feature frequently... Is there a word on this page you need to look up? 

Chapter One

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Which of following describes the setting so far? 
Throughout the beginning of the novel, the author is giving you clues as to how Murphy really is, rather than how others describe her. Is she happy with her life? See below for more information about inferences to find out. (This annotation contains a video)
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Which piece of textual evidence best helps the reader to infer that Murphy is unhappy with her life? 
Can you hear the dogs' claws sliding on the hardwood floors? By invoking your sense of hearing the author is using a literary technique called imagery. See below for more information about this technique.  (This annotation contains a video)
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Which of the following literary devices describes the highlighted text? 
This email, inserted into the end of chapter one, manages to neatly summarize some important plot points. Pay attention to the details that appear at the end of many of the chapters, often in italics. 

Chapter Two

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What can you infer about Leeda's feelings towards her sister? 
This narrator uses many similes to describe her surroundings. See below for more information about this literary device, and its companion, metaphor.  (This annotation contains a video)
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According to Mrs. Cawley-Smith, why should Leeda spend time at her Uncle Walter's house? 

Chapter Three

Here is an image of the type of dog that helped trap Murphy.  (This annotation contains an image)
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How can you infer that her solace is not actually in her cello? 
Here is one thing that Birdie and Leeda have in common: they both dislike Mr. Balmeade. 
One of the themes in the novel is the importance of loyalty. This theme appears in all sorts of relationships, in this case, the relationship between employer and employee. Not sure how to find themes? See below for some help in identifying emerging themes.  (This annotation contains a video)
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Which of the following literary devices is evident in the highlighted text? 

Chapter Four

Authors reveal characters in many ways. Sometimes, they tell you what to think, but more often they allow you to make up your own mind, using indirect characterization. See below for more information about this technique, and decide for yourself what you should think about Jodee.  (This annotation contains a video)
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Based on Murphy's thoughts, how might she be feeling right now? 
At this point in the story, Murphy is only thinking about herself.  
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As Leeda describes people and places based on her sense of smell, the author is employing which of the following literary devices? 
The point of view of this story can be hard to follow, because the narrator keeps changing. By employing third-person limited point of view but changing the perspective of the narrator, the author forces the reader to infer what the other characters are thinking. See below for more information about point of view.  (This annotation contains a video)

Chapter Five

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What does this thought reveal about Murphy? 
Since we are effectively looking through Murphy's eyes, we can only know what she knows. Watch for how the author deftly uses third-person limited point of view to add a sense of mystery to the story. 
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Which of the following literary devices is evident in the highlighted text? 
Here again is another detail, showing that Murphy is dissatisfied with her life. Now, we get a clue as to why she feels so frustrated. She is smarter than the universe expects her to be. 
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What can you infer about why Walter will not renew the insurance? 
Why might Leeda have changed the subject? 
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Why is Enrico unique to the workers? 
What has Murphy just figured out? 

Chapter Six

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What does Murphy actually like about the orchard? 
Have you ever heard of fire ants? If not, see this short video below to learn more about them.  (This annotation contains a video)
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Which of the following sentences best fits as an example of imagery? 
Here, the theme of the importance of loyalty is expressed in Rex's lack of reaction to Murphy's beauty. How will Murphy react to this lack of attention? 

Chapter Seven

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Why is Murphy not invited to the parties Leeda goes to? 
Is Leeda finally realizing that the Darlingtons are hurting for money? 
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Describe in your own words why Leeda doesn't like trees. 
Will the Darlingtons be able to keep the orchard? 
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What is attacking the girls? 

Chapter Eight

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Look up the definition for euphemism. Why might Birdie want "a euphemism for spying"? 
What will happen if there is a frost? 
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How is Birdie treating Leeda? 
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Which of the following definitions best fits the word "loaded" as used in the sentence? 
Could the author be referencing Miss Havisham, from Great Expectations? See below for more information. (This annotation contains a video)
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What can you infer about Birdie's mother? 
Quiz 1 

Chapter Nine

Notice the imagery here. 
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What is Birdie doing? 
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What theme is evident in the highlighted text? 

Chapter Ten

Her hard work and sacrifice motivates the workers. Why did it not motivate Leeda or Murphy? 
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What is Enrico trying to say about Birdie? 

Chapter Eleven

The highlighted text represents an example of personification. See below for more information about this literary device.  (This annotation contains a video)
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What is Leeda's role in Danay's wedding? 
What will happen if Leeda's family finds out? 
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What do these other people have that Leeda feels she lacks? 
This tug of war could be a symbol. Cynthia seems to be a quitter, while Birdie tries to the last minute to save what she cares about. See below for more information about symbols.  (This annotation contains a video)
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The papers must be 
Murphy is much smarter than she lets on to others. 
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Write the best example of a sentence containing a metaphor that can be found on this page. 
The three girls will be together again. Will they become friends in the face of adversity? 

Chapter Twelve

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Which of the following sentences best represents imagery? 
Remember that Birdie loves the farm. Why might she be angry at Murphy and Leeda? 
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What motif is evident in this page? 
Will she kiss him? 
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Which of the following represents the characterization in the highlighted text? 
Maybe Murphy doesn't know what she is feeling, either. 
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Which of the following literary devices is evident in the highlighted text? 
Wondering what Leeda's dogs might look like? See the image below. (This annotation contains an image)
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Which of the following types of characterization best identifies the highlighted text? 
Here, might be one of Murphy's motivation: to treat men the way they treat her mother. 

Chapter Thirteen

Have you ever looked at a peach tree up close? See this image to help you imagine what it might look like.  (This annotation contains an image)
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Using what you saw in the image for comparison, what is one similarity between the image of the orchard and the orchard in the text? 
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Which of the following cultures is represented in the highlighted text? 
Note the motif of smells here. 
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What does this detail reveal about Leeda? 
Notice the imagery here, and envy them, as they eat fresh picked peaches. See below for an image of some perfect peaches.  (This annotation contains an image)
The importance of loyalty theme is developed here, this time, in conjunction with friendship. 

Chapter Fourteen

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What place has cemented the girls' friendship? 
Here again is the motif of smell. 
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Why does Leeda feel she must justify herself to Murphy? 
Remember that Murphy is extremely smart. 
Signs offering to sell boiled peanuts are common in Georgia. See below.  (This annotation contains an image)
Murphy establishes herself as well read, as she quotes Jack Kerouac, a famous writer who wrote On the Road, where this quotation is from. Be prepared to compare the men in the bar with the people Kerouac describes.  (This annotation contains a video)
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Compare the two men with which Birdie and Leena dance to the "mad ones . . . the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn  . . . like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars." 
The image of the three pairs of panties mentioned in the prologue now becomes clear. 
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What textual evidence helps the reader realize that Rex and Leeda will not stay together? 

Chapter Fifteen

Will Leeda and Birdie miss her? 
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Which of the following motifs is evident in the highlighted text? 
Will Leeda believe she is loyal, if Rex treats Murphy "like any other guy"? 
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How does this scene demonstrate how Birdie, Leeda, and Murphy are the same? 
Danae was the Greek goddess of music and poetry, and Leda was not a goddess, but a victim of a god. Zeus raped her and she gave birth to Helen of Troy. 

Chapter Sixteen

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Why might Birdie be losing weight? 
Remember that this novel is written in third-person limited point of view, so it is Birdie's thought that Enrico looks this way.  
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Which of the highlighted sentences is the best example of simile? 
When school starts, will they still be friends? 
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Is Murphy a good or a bad influence on Birdie? Justify your response with textual evidence. 
Quiz 2 
So Leeda might be right--her mother did not want a second child. Does Leeda have some mystic connection with the orchard, since she was conceived there? 

Chapter Seventeen

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Why might this greeting upset Leeda? 
Even Murphy sees that Mrs. Cawley-Smith isn't interested in her daughter. 
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What does this exchange between Rex and Murphy reveal about Rex's feelings? 
Both Rex and Murphy are loyal to Leeda. How will this conversation look to outsiders, who cannot hear what they discuss? 
Is Leeda upset with what Murphy said to Leeda's mom? 
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How does the point of view affect the story in this scene? 
Ever heard of the 1989 movie Steel Magnolias? It's a movie about southern women who become friends. Below is a series of short, funny clips from the movie.  (This annotation contains a video)
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Predict what might change in Birdie's life. 

Chapter Eighteen

Gabriel Garcia Marquez is a famous Hispanic writer. In addition to Love in the Time of Cholera, the book Enrico was reading, he has written One Hundred Years of Solitude and other famous works.  
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Explain how the highlighted sentences help develop the theme of the importance of loyalty. 
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How have Murphy's feelings towards Rex changed? 
Although we never get to see the story from Rex's point of view, we can decide for ourselves if he is a static or a dynamic character. See below for more information about these two types of characters and decide for yourself.  (This annotation contains a video)
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What point of view is evident in the highlighted text? 
Can you see how Birdie has changed this summer? 
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Which of the following literary devices is evident in the highlighted text? 
Can Murphy show Birdie how she, too, has changed? 

Chapter Nineteen

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Why might "her limbs feel heavy"? 
Now, it is Birdie's turn to play a prank. 
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What motif is evident on this page? 
In this way, Murphy shows she believes that she has not changed. Do you agree? 
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According to Poopie, what should the nectarine symbolize? 
Notice the theme of the importance of loyalty. 
Murphy's friendship with Leeda and Birdie is more important than any boy. 
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Which of the following literary devices best describes the highlighted text? 
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Which of the following themes explains why Murphy is so upset? 
All good stories have conflict. This scene represents the climax of the conflict, where each girl feels the others have betrayed her. This is a classic man vs man situation. How can they remain friends, now that the summer is over? 

Chapter Twenty

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How does the highlighted text demonstrate Leeda is a dynamic character? 
Have they talked about what Birdie saw? 
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The highlighted sentence is an example of 
Murphy feels she has no choice but to return to her rut. Do you agree? 
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What two things are are being compared in this highlighted metaphor? 
Note the importance of loyalty here. 
Is Murphy right? 

Chapter Twenty-One

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Where does Murphy think they are they going? 
Rex definitely knows the importance of loyalty. Does Leeda?  
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Why are Murphy and Leeda not talking? 
Ready for what? 
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Who does Birdie think this girl is? 
Now the italicized text is an example of foreshadowing. Never heard of this structural technique? See below for more information.  (This annotation contains a video)

Chapter Twenty-Two

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What does this feeling foreshadow? 
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Which of the following themes is evident in the highlighted text? 
Remember the tropical storm about to hit Georgia?  
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What can you infer about what Murphy is saying here? 
When an author repeats the initial sounds of words, this is called alliteration. See below for more information about this literary device.  (This annotation contains a video)

Chapter Twenty-Three

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Why is Birdie crying? 
Everyone thinks they can save the orchard, except Walter. 
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What must have happened? 

Chapter Twenty-Four

Enrico can't tell her, but he is saying he loves her and knows now she loves him, too. 
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How might this comment by Danay challenge Leeda's beliefs?  
Leeda is a dynamic character, too. 
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Where must they be going? 

Chapter Twenty-Five

Birdie is finally standing up for herself. Will it make a difference? 
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Who must have written the note? 
Notice the reference to the Greek myth? 
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What might the squid be in reference to? 
The conflict has been resolved. 

Chapter Twenty-Six

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Which of the following literary devices is evident in the highlighted text? 
Quiz 3