Twelve Angry Men

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Presents a courtroom drama revolving around the trial of a boy accused of killing his father, where one man, a single hold-out juror, stands between the accused and capital punishment.
Curriculet Details
24 Questions
25 Annotations
2 Quizzes

Designed for students in ninth and tenth grades, this free digital curriculum contains annotations explaining the historical setting of the play, as well as some of the legal terms used and the references to people and places. It also contains interactive videos that support comprehension, such as videos about character development, mood and tone, and the use of hyperbole. Over the course of the book, students will answer Common Core questions and quizzes related to the subjects of the pursuit of truth and justice, the use of literary devices, and the development of and interaction between disparate characters. This free online unit will increase student engagement while building reading comprehension.

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Homework #3

This play came out of the author's own experience of being on the jury of a manslaughter case. He also wrote and directed the film version of the play. In 1957, Rose received the Oscar nominations for Best Screenplay and Best Picture. 
This play came out of the author's own experience of being on the jury of a manslaughter case. He also wrote and directed the film version of the play. In 1957, Rose received the Oscar nominations for Best Screenplay and Best Picture. 

Introduction

Did you know you can look up any word in the text of the book or the text of the questions and answers? Just click or press on the word you want to define and hold until the blue text selector pops up. When you release, a define option will appear. Since it's so easy to look up words, make sure you use this feature frequently... Is there a word on this page you need to look up?  
The essay's author writes about two Americas--the "them" America and the "us" America. In a country that values individuality, sometimes we have trouble accepting those who are different. In a country that promises hard work will equal prosperity, sometimes we have trouble understanding that hardworking individuals may never become prosperous because of difficult circumstances. In what ways is the author of the essay correct about the "two" Americas? In what ways is the author incorrect? 
In the American justice system, certain crimes receive a "trial by jury," a group of ordinary people selected from the community. In these cases the judge does not decide if the person being tried for a crime is guilty or innocent. It is up to the twelve members of the jury to decide the face of the accused. Jury duty is a responsibility for every American citizen and every juror must swear an oath, a promise, to "follow all of the rules of the law" and must not let personal opinions or feelings interfere with their duty. Jurors must give their verdict "without prejudice or sympathy" for the person being tried. In the play, twelve jurors will decide if a young man accused of murdering his father deserves the death penalty. Would it be hard for you to keep your personal opinions from influencing your decision? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1
What does the essay's author claim is the "highest state of humanity" the jury must reach? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6
The essay's author claims "the good drama...leaves the issue in doubt." Instead of giving the audience an expected, feel-good ending, the play Twelve Angry Men leaves its audience to wrestle with the "two Americas" from the beginning of the essay. If the ending is not an easy one, what do you think it will be? Make a prediction about the ending of the play and discuss how your prediction relates to the "two Americas" idea. 

Homework #8

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1
What important information do we learn on this page? 
The modern civil rights movement was launched in the 1950s. Studying this period in U.S. history will help you gain a greater appreciation for the themes of this play.  (This annotation contains an image)

ACT I

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4
What does "fancy" mean in the highlighted text? 
Watch this video for some tips on appreciating the character development in the play you are reading.  (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1
3rd Juror seems to be 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4
Which is an example of verbal irony? 
The "face" of the Yankees in the 1950s was quite different from today's team.  (This annotation contains an image)
To whom do you think 10th Juror is referring when he says "those people"? What does it reflect about his views? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1
Which of the jurors quickly give 8th Juror a hard time for his "not guilty" vote? 
There are many legal terms that are important to understand for this book. Burden of proof is one of them. In this case, when 8th Juror states that the "burden of proof is on the prosecution" he means it is up to the prosecutor to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant is guilty of any crime.  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3
Do you believe that 3rd Juror's personal feelings play no role in his decision making? What have we learned about him that informs your opinion? Use textual evidence to support your answer.  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5
What does the highlighted text reveal about 3rd Juror? 
Note how 5th Juror uses his own background both to identify with and distance himself from the accused. Do you think this will affect how he votes? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6
What is your impression of 4th Juror at this point in the text? How does the author separate 4th Juror from the other men? Write two sentences comparing him to the other jurors. 
How does the mood change when 8th Juror presents the second knife?  (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3
Why do you think 8th Juror proposes a vote at this juncture in the play? 
As you continue to read the play, take notes on the sequence in which different jurors change their vote.  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4
The use of "murderous" here is an example of 
Reasonable doubt is at the heart of this drama, as well as at the heart of many famous criminal trials. Watch the clip below to understand an explanation of reasonable doubt.  (This annotation contains a video)
"El" train refers to an elevated train. Can you imagine the noise it makes as it passes by apartments?  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8
8th Juror builds a logical, intelligent argument here about the train. What impact do you think his words will have on the other jurors? 
The speech of several jurors is peppered with hyperbole and other kinds of figurative language. Watch the clip below to understand how figurative language illuminates text.  (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3
Which statement best reflects 11th Juror's state of mind at this point in the play? 
This refers to a very famous boxng match between Jack Dempsey and Luis Angel Firpo.  (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5
How does the pacing change after the guard brings in a diagram of the apartment as evidence? Use examples from the text to support your answer. 
After watching this video, think about the roles of the protagonist and antagonist in this play.  (This annotation contains a video)
12 Angry Men - Quiz #1 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2
The principal conflict by the end of Act I is between 

ACT II

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1
What do you imagine the other jurors think of 3rd Juror and his most recent outburst? Use textual evidence to support your answer.  
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4
What does the idiomatic phrase in the highlighted text mean? 
Authors often use weather to suggest mood and/or changes. How do the references to the weather in this play affect the mood? 
Queens is one of the five boroughs of New York City. In the map below, Queens is shaded in green. Why might the foreman mentions the storm and the setting in his recollection? (This annotation contains an image)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1
What do 7th Juror and 10th Juror have in common? 
A "whodunit" refers to a murder mystery, a work of fiction. Might the author have chosen to reference this film to reinforce the murder mystery in this drama? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5
What do we learn about 11th Juror in the highlighted text? 
The murdered man was killed with a switch knife. A switch knife, also known as a switchblade, must be released and held carefully to avoid injury. Why is this information important to the members of the jury? (This annotation contains an image)
Read 10th Juror's monologue and then watch the film clip. Does the director portray the scene as you imagine it?  (This annotation contains a video)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3
Why are various jurors getting up to move around and leave the room? 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5
Does this outburst represent a turning point for 4th Juror? Pay close attention to his remarks over the next several pages. 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2
Why does 9th Juror bring up the marks on the side of the woman's nose? 
Below is a photograph of Clarence Darrow, a well known lawyer in the late 1800s and early 1900s. In 1925, Darrow defended high school teacher John Scopes during the "Scopes Monkey Trial" when he was accused of teaching evolution in his classroom. Darrow lost the trial, but the case was overturned on a technicality.  (This annotation contains an image)
Another film version of "Twelve Angry Men" was made in 1997. What differences do you notice by watching the trailer? What implications could these changes have for the play?  (This annotation contains a video)
12 Angry Men - Quiz #2 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6
Reflect on the final stage directions. What mood does the author invoke? What questions does he leave us with? Use textual examples to support your answer.